Thursday, July 15, 2004

Ethical conduct pays off !

In recent research performed by the Institute of BE - an organization which is promoting corporate ethical best practices, it was found that companies displaying a "clear commitment to ethical conduct" almost invariably outperform companies that do not display ethical conduct. The Director of the Institute of BE, Philippa Foster Black, stated: "Not only is ethical behavior in the B. world the right and principled thing to do, but it has been proven that ethical behavior pays off in financial returns." These findings deserve to be considered as an important tool for companies striving for long-term prospects and growth.

The following 7 Principles of B. Integrity are a good starting off place to consider. By integrating each of these principles within a company environment, a major step towards a responsible enterprise can be made.

Principle 1: Recognize that customers/clients want to do B. with a company they can trust; when trust is at the core of a company, it is easy to recognize. Trust defined is assured reliance on the character, ability, strength, or truth of a B.

Principle 2: For continuous improvement of a company, the leader of an organization must be willing to open up to ideas for betterment. Ask for opinions and feedback from both customers and team members and your company will continue to grow.

Principle 3: Regardless of the circumstances, do everything in your power to gain the trust of past customer's and clients, particularly if something has gone awry. Do what you can to reclaim any lost B. by honoring all commitments and obligations.

Principle 4: Re-evaluate all print materials including small B. advertising, brochures and other B. documents making sure they are clear, precise and professional; most important make sure they do not misrepresent or misinterpret.

Principle 5: Remain involved in community-related issues and activities thereby demonstrating that your B. is a responsible community contributor. In other words, stay involved.

Principle 6: Take a hands-on approach in regard to accounting and record keeping, not only as a means of gaining a better feel for the progress of your company, but as a resource for any "questionable " activities; gaining control of accounting and record keeping allows you to end any dubious activities promptly.

Principle 7: Treat others with the utmost of respect. Regardless of differences, positions, titles, ages, or other types of distinctions, always treat others with professional respect and courtesy.

1 Comments:

Blogger Alex said...

I can’t find any holes in your 7 principles. The following principles:

Principle 1: Recognize that customers/clients want to do business with a company they can trust; when trust is at the core of a company, it is easy to recognize. Trust defined is assured reliance on the character, ability, strength, or truth of a business.

Principle 3: Regardless of the circumstances, do everything in your power to gain the trust of past customer's and clients, particularly if something has gone awry. Do what you can to reclaim any lost business by honoring all commitments and obligations.

Principle 4: Re-evaluate all print materials including small business advertising, brochures and other business documents making sure they are clear, precise and professional; most important make sure they do not misrepresent or misinterpret.

Principle 5: Remain involved in community-related issues and activities thereby demonstrating that your business is a responsible community contributor. In other words, stay involved.

Principle 7: Treat others with the utmost of respect. Regardless of differences, positions, titles, ages, or other types of distinctions, always treat others with professional respect and courtesy.

applies to any organization whether or not it is organized as a pyramid with the CEO sitting at the pinnacle or flat which emphasizes the Team.

The principles which are closer to motherhood statements are:

Principle 2: For continuous improvement of a company, the leader of an organization must be willing to open up to ideas for betterment. Ask for opinions and feedback from both customers and team members and your company will continue to grow.

Principle 6: Take a hands-on approach in regard to accounting and record keeping, not only as a means of gaining a better feel for the progress of your company, but as a resource for any "questionable " activities; gaining control of accounting and record keeping allows you to end any dubious activities promptly.

As far as Principle 2 is concerned most team members are defined as anyone who reports to the CEO. You can argue, of course, that in order to cover the other people we have Suggestion Boxes but in reality, if anyone "suggests" that the organization has a (fill in the blank) section which is an organizational piece of crap or there is a leader on one of the lower levels that is hopelessly out to lunch everyone wants to find and kill the messenger rather than deal with the problem.

Principle 6 is a real motherhood statement. If something goes sour on the accounting and record keeping level which hits the fan the number 1 excuse is that the CEO is not supposed to have that level of detail.

8:01 PM  

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